May

31

Conditions:

Visibility: 10m

Water Temp: ??c

Bottom Time: 50minutes

Max Depth: 21m

Details: After diving Cathedral Caves, our second dive was going to be one of the smaller caves in Waterfall Bay. This wasn’t as vast as the cathedral cave system but still a great dive. The entrance to the cave was nice with some different anemones around and smaller fish. More zooanthid lined walls around the entrance. Again, very difficult to photograph.

Camera Details: Tokina 10-17mm 2 X Inon z240 Strobes

Photos:

May

31

Conditions:

Visibility: 10m

Water Temp: ??c

Bottom Time: 50minutes

Max Depth: 21m

Details: Today we headed down to Waterfall Bay to dive the Cathedral Cave complex – a labyrinth of tunnels and caves beneath massive sea arches. This is one of those sites that you just have to dive for yourself, since photos just cant capture the experience. It was like this area was designed by divers, for divers, although i doubt anyone could conceive such magnificent structures. After descending beneath one of the arches, you descend into about 20m and head into the cavernous spaces below. Various boulders strewn over the bottom conceal cracks forming the entrance to a number of different tunnels that snake their way through the cliffs. Entering some of the tunnels is tight and you burrow your way through the tunnels that seem to go on forever but eventually open up in more great caverns. One of the more memorable was entering Skull Cave with two massive glowing eyes pulsating before you as you leave the darkness of the tunnels behind you. A guide is absolutely essential for this dive, especially for the first couple of visits.

Camera Details: Tokina 10-17mm 2 X Inon z240 Strobes

Photos:

May

30

Conditions:

Visibility: 10m

Water Temp: ??c

Bottom Time: 40minutes

Max Depth: 4m

Details: After returning from our dives at Deep Glen Bay, we did a short surface interval and then headed down to the boat ramp to see if we could find any seahorses and swim with the seal that was hanging around. So after driving down and gearing up, i quickly realised i forget my hood..oh no…suck it up, your only hear once…but boy did it hurt! After 40 minutes so, i was deliriously cold. I did spot one seahorse, but it was hanging off the pylon un-cooperatively. There were lots of different crabs around, swimmer crabs, hermit crabs and ‘hairy’ decorator crabs..just enjoying the tuna offcuts the fisherman ditch over the edge.

Camera Details: Tokina 10-17mm 2 X Inon z240 Strobes

Photos:

May

30

Conditions:

Visibility: 20m

Water Temp: ??c

Bottom Time: 50minutes

Max Depth: 20m

Details: The second dive at Deep Glen Bay was on the opposite side to the wall, and was a bit of an exploratory dive. It turned out to be fantastic with massive granite boulders scattered on the descending seawalls, forming awesome swim through, caves etc. Lots of life around too, including a yellow sea spider floating mid water right at the end of the dive…making a great wide angle subject!

Camera Details: Tokina 10-17mm 2 X Inon z240 Strobes

Photos:

May

30

Conditions:

Visibility: 20m

Water Temp: ??c

Bottom Time: 50minutes

Max Depth: 28m

Details: Day two at Eaglehawk and we ventured off north to Deep Glen Bay which is known as the site where survivors of the Blythe Star shipwreck came ashore. The first dive was on the wall running out to a point. The wall was covered in invertebrate life and was very colourful with yellow zooanthids, orange sponges and purple finger sponges. Some Bastard Trumpeter formed a big school at about 25m and circled around as we looked out into the blue. On the safety stop, the shallow section of the wall was covered in sea tulips being tossed around in the surge and upwelling against the wall.

Camera Details: Tokina 10-17mm 2 X Inon z240 Strobes

Photos:

May

29

Conditions:

Visibility: 5m

Water Temp: ??c

Bottom Time: 30minutes

Max Depth: 38m

Details: I can only explain this dive in one way – ‘Narked off my tits!!!’. This is one of the deepest cold water dives i’ve done, and it felt like i was finally being initiated into the deep arts. The wreck itself was a little disappointing, and i probably should have pushed past 40m to get to below the hull line. It was very dark down there and, mixed with the narcosis, not many photos were keepers. On ascent there were a few large salps floating around to pass the stop time.

Camera Details: Tokina 10-17mm 2 X Inon z240 Strobes

Photos:

May

29

Conditions:

Visibility: 10m

Water Temp: ??c

Bottom Time: 60minutes

Max Depth: 20m

Details: This was Dive Number 1 of a trip to the East coast of Tasmania with Phil, Deb and Hui. The forecast was for wild SW winds and swells and i was expecting diving to be put on hold. However, the coast around Eaglehawk neck is protected from south westerly swell and with some of the largest sea cliffs in Australia, there is always a sheltered place to tuck into in one of the bights and bays. Our first stop was the Giant Kelp Forests of Munro Bight. Kelp Forests (Macrocystis pyrifera) used to be a feature of many coastal areas of Eastern Tasmania, but now only few remain. The one in Munro Bight has apparently made a bit of a comeback and this was one of the dives we were looking forward to. We arrived at the bight after a spectacular, albeit bumpy, ride down south from the boat ramp. This is the same bay were the SS Nord lies, which was going to be our second dive. We eaglery got in and explored the magnificent kelp forest. Fish life was down and the overcast conditions made it fairly dark, however blue water and moments of sun peaking through the canopy made some memorable diving.

Camera Details: Tokina 10-17mm 2 X Inon z240 Strobes

Photos: