Jun

4

Conditions:

Visibility: 10m

Water Temp: ??c

Bottom Time: 60minutes

Max Depth: 15m

Details: After i thought i was done for the day, Bruce insisted i come down and dive The Rock again while they practiced deploying SMB’s. I’m not one to knock back a dive, so the gear was back out and off we went to the Breakwater. It turned into a good critter dive with a big Smooth Ray straight up, then a Draughtboard Shark, a couple of Weedy Seadragons and a Sea Spider.

Camera Details: Canon 60mm 2 X Inon z240 Strobes

Photos:

Jun

2

Conditions:

Visibility: Night Dive

Water Temp: ??c

Bottom Time: 60minutes

Max Depth: 12m

Details: That night we did a night dive at Waubs Bay. I decided to leave the wide-angled lens on in case there were some Weedy Seadragons around, but didn’t have any luck. The first interesting critter was a Wavy Volute, a gastropod with zig zagged designs on its shell and mantle. The Banded Stingaree’s were less flight at night, but still didn’t like my approach while they were trying to sleep. Cowfish were also a bit stunned in the 4000 lumen torch beam and werent exactly happy to be woken up. One the way back, we spotted a Seahorse clutched to the base of a kelp stem, picking off mysid shrimp – a difficult subject with the fisheye lens, especially with a million mysid shrimp dancing around the light.

Camera Details: Tokina 10-17mm 2 X Inon z240 Strobes

Photos:

Jun

1

Conditions:

Visibility: 10m

Water Temp: ??c

Bottom Time: 60minutes

Max Depth: 15m

Details: Bicheno is know for its shore diving, and one of the easiest spots to get in is at the breakwater/boat ramp in Waubs Bay. The entry here is protected from the swell, with the only downside getting through the thick layer of kelp floating on the surface. Once down, you head out towards the point, along the gently sloping shoreline reef that is covered in kelp. There are some smaller rocks and bommies further out on the sand, but the destination is ‘The Rock’ which sits in about 15m and rises about 5m up into the water column. Along the way though, there is a good chance to see Weedy Seadragons. And this was the critter i was after on this dive. The Tasmanian subspecies of Weedy Seadragon is different to the ones on the mainland. It has a much redder colouration and a broader abdomen with apparently longer dorsal and pectoral fins. It was the tail that really stood out to me though, it seems much more ‘seahorse’ like and gave the impression that this was an earlier genetic form that the ones on the mainland. Luckily Hui spotted our first one only 10 minutes into the dive and a few more made an appearance along the way. A great shore dive.

Camera Details: Tokina 10-17mm 2 X Inon z240 Strobes

Photos: